Why marriage isn’t always happily ever after

| Jan 16, 2015 | Divorce |

Individuals who recently wed likely have many goals when contemplating their futures with a spouse. Among some of the most common marital goals are purchasing a home, having children and attaining a sense of financial security. For most, divorce isn’t even something they likely think about or contemplate, yet national statistics prove that nearly one out of every two marriages will end in divorce. 

In an effort to understand human behavior and help account for why so many marriages start off well but end in divorce; social scientists and researchers are continually looking at trends and possible predictors of divorce. For example, a study conducted by researchers at Kansas State University revealed that above all other conflicts, those related to finances are the number one predictor of divorce. The findings of a national survey indicate that the earlier on in a marriage argument about money occurs, the more likely a couple will divorce. 

In addition to conflicts over finances, the ages at which spouses marry also appear to play a major role in whether or not they will subsequently divorce. Based upon information provided by The National Marriage Project, statistically, the younger an individual is when he or she marries, the more likely that a marriage won’t last.

In addition to the seemingly ill-fated marriages of the very young, individuals who choose to marry someone who is 10 or more years older or younger are also significantly more likely to divorce. An Emory University study looked at factors that statistically appear to either positively or negatively affect relationships between spouses. Researchers’ findings indicate that the larger the age gap between spouses, the greater the likelihood that they’ll divorce. For example, spouses with an age gap of just five years are 18 percent more likely to divorce than spouses who are the same age. 

For individuals who are contemplating divorce, there are likely numerous factors contributing to one’s unhappy marital state. Regardless of why a marriage isn’t going to end up being til death do us part, it’s important to take steps to ensure one’s future financial security and that of one’s children is preserved and protected. 

Source: The Huffington Post, “8 Signs Your Marriage Was Doomed From The Start,” Amanda Scherker, Jan. 7, 2015

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