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Peoria 309-407-3332
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Divorce Archives

If divorce goes to court, how you behave matters

Most couples in the Peoria area going through divorce file irreconcilable differences as the reason for the action. That catchall phrase allows you to seek a dissolution of marriage without having to establish legal grounds -- something that can take a great deal of time and be complicated.

Ways to avoid trickle-down effect when grandparents divorce

Back in the Reagan years, trickle-down economics was in vogue. The general idea was that you spur investment by giving investors tax breaks. That spurs production, which spurs job creation, which in turn puts money in consumers' pockets. Demand for all that upstream production goes up. Everyone wins.

Why you should think twice before hitting 'send'

If you feel like smartphones have changed the way we communicate, you’re probably right. In just a few taps, we can tell all of our friends where we are at by clicking “check in” on Facebook, share our latest culinary masterpiece on Instagram, and even show off our vacation photos while we are still on vacation.

Will you be responsible for paying student loan debt?

In the midst of a divorce, dealing with the emotional issues may be difficult enough. However, preparing for life after divorce is something that all divorcees should be preparing for, and your emotions should not impair this process. As we have noted in some of our prior posts, developing a post divorce budget is key; but what good is a potential budget if you don’t know what you are going to be responsible for after your divorce is finalized.

Don't let gray divorce put you in the red

Over the past few years, study after study has shown that more couples in their 50s and 60s are divorcing. And not just a few more: According to a recent report from Bowling Green State University in Ohio, the number of divorces in the 55- to 64-year-old age group doubled from 1990 to 2012; for 65-years-old and up, the number tripled during the same time period.

Property division and the ABCs of QDROs

Imagine a young couple decides to end their five-year marriage. Bob and Judy have no children and no pets. They do not own a house, and they have kept their finances separate. An inheritance from Judy's aunt, for example, was not deposited in a joint account, where it would raise issues of commingling marital and non-marital property -- in fact, they have no joint account. They both have good jobs, so neither is expecting spousal maintenance.

Fairness may not be the point in pre-nup battle, p. 2

About 18 months ago, Illinois hedge fund billionaire Ken Griffin filed for divorce from his wife Anne Dias Griffin. According to reports at the time, the move came as a surprise to Dias Griffin, but the couple had been living apart for a while. In fact, the Daily Mail reported that Griffin had moved out in 2012 when Dias Griffin was pregnant with their youngest child.

Is Illinois a 'community property' state?

Property division in a divorce can be more complicated than either spouse thinks. In general, all assets and debts will fall into one of three categories: Spouse A's property, Spouse B's property and the couple's marital property. While the spouses retain their own property, states differ on how marital property is divided. Wisconsin, for example, is a community property state. Illinois, however, is an equitable distribution state.

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Morton, IL 61550

Toll Free: 888-314-9667
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Peoria, IL 61602

Toll Free: 888-314-9667
Phone: 309-407-3332
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