Surviving the holiday season while in the midst of a divorce

| Nov 26, 2014 | Divorce |

When going through a divorce and all the challenges the process presents, it’s odd to think that, for many people, life goes on as normal. This reality, however, becomes especially apparent during the holiday season as families across the country gather together to be merry and give thanks.

With Thanksgiving Day nearly upon us, it’s likely that individuals going through a divorce are experiencing an array of strong emotions. This is often especially the case when there are children involved and when an individual traditionally hosts family and friends for a Thanksgiving feast.

While some individuals who are in the midst of a divorce may feel the need to pretend that everything is fine and go about their normal Thanksgiving routines, choosing to suppress one’s emotions can backfire.

Anyone who has ever gone through a major break up or divorce knows it’s a difficult and emotionally draining process. Being honest and upfront with loved ones about this fact doesn’t make an individual appear weak, but rather human.

This Thanksgiving Day and throughout the holiday season, individuals going through a divorce would be wise to take a deep breath and take a timeout from the expected holiday traditions.

An individual should feel no pressure to meet certain expectations or participate in annual rituals. Right now, taking good care of oneself physically, emotionally and mentally is the most important thing and being able to do so is definitely something to be thankful for.

Individuals who are going through a divorce or who recently divorced and are having an especially difficult time this holiday season would be wise to seek help. Talking about one’s feelings with a trusted family member, friend or professional therapist can be a tremendous relief and help an individual move past hurt and anger and towards a happier future. 

Source: The Huffington Post, “Going Through a Divorce? Here’s a Thanksgiving Recipe for Success!,” Christina Pesoli, Nov. 21, 2014

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